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Maintenance & Prevention

Rick The Plumber is based on creating relationships for a lifetime, offering only high-quality services which we are the best at for a fair price. Rick has over 22 years of experience in Plumbing and the total team combined has over 80 years in the industry focusing on Plumbing, Gas, and HVAC. The Goal is for our employees to love coming to work and we do that by treating them correctly leading to the best quality customer service as we reward our team by taking care of them for being the best
Rick believes everyone should be treated equal and that their efforts should be recognized daily. It's what makes Rick The Plumber truly different...
You probably don’t think much about the network of water and sewer pipes inside your walls that deliver your hot and cold water — and eliminate your waste — on demand.
But giving your plumbing a little regular attention can prolong its life, prevent leaks, and avoid costly repairs. Here’s how to care for the pipes in your house.
 
 
Avoid Chemical Drain-Clearing Products
Clogged drains are the most common home plumbing problem, and you can buy chemicals to clear them. But these products sometimes do more harm than good. They can actually erode cast-iron drainpipes.
 
 
Better to hire Rick and completely remove the chunk of hair or grease that’s plugging the line. 
 
 
Prevent Future Clogging
Clogs aren’t just nuisances. Backed-up water puts added pressure on your waste pipes, stressing them and shortening their lifespan. So avoid plug-ups by watching what goes down your drains. That means keeping food scraps out of kitchen drains, hair out of bathroom drains, and anything but sewage and toilet paper out of toilets.
 
 
Install screens over drains in showers and tubs, and pull out what hair you can every few weeks to prevent buildups. Scrape food into the trash before doing dishes—even if you have a disposal—and never put liquid grease down the drain; pour it into a sealable container to put in the garbage after it cools.
 
 
“Grease is only liquid when it’s hot,” Gove says. “When you pour it down the drain, it cools and becomes solid. Do that enough, and just like a clogged artery, your drains won’t work anymore.”
 
 
Reduce the Pressure
As nice as high water pressure can be when you’re taking a shower or filling a stockpot, it stresses your pipes, increasing the likelihood of a leak. “That drastically reduces the life of your plumbing,” says Rick, it makes your pipe joints, faucets, and appliance valves work harder.”
 
 
By the way, adding a low-flow showerhead won’t affect pressure in the pipes. It only affects the amount of water coming out of the showerhead itself.
 
 
Soften the Water
If your water has a high mineral content—known as hard water—it can shorten your plumbing’s lifespan. Those naturally occurring minerals, usually magnesium or calcium, build up inside your pipes and restrict flow, increasing the pressure. Plus, they can corrode joints and fittings. Although hard water can occur anywhere, it’s most common in the Southwest and parts of the Northeast.
 
 
A white buildup on showerheads and faucets is a telltale sign of hard water. Or, if your house receives municipal water service, you can easily find out how hard it is. By law, every municipality must file an annual water quality report with the Environmental Protection Agency. If you have a well, check your most recent water test report for hardness information. Anything over 140 parts per million is considered hard water.
 
 
The only way to effectively deal with hard water is by installing a water softener. Most use sodium to counteract the minerals in your water, but new electronic softeners use electromagnetic pulses to dissolve minerals and have the advantage of not adding sodium to your water.
 
 
If you opt for a sodium-based softener, consider installing a whole-house pre-filter at the same time. Since the plumber will already be cutting into your pipes to install the softener, it will not only will it give you cleaner drinking water by removing particulates and chlorine, you’ll reduce stress on your pipes that can occur when those particles clog faucet filters.
 
 
Keep Your Sewer Lines or Septic Tank Clear
If you have municipal sewers, hire a plumber to snake your main sewage cleanout every few years. This will cost $75 to $150, and will remove tree roots that inevitably work their way into these pipes—leading to messy sewage backups. If you have a septic system, get the tank pumped out every three to five years.
 
 
Other Ways to Avoid Trouble
1. Learn where your home’s main water shut-off valve is—so if there’s ever a leak, you can go straight there and quickly turn off the water to the entire house.
2. Remove hoses from outdoor spigots in winter to prevent frozen water from cracking the pipes and causing a flood.
3. Add pipe insulation to the plumbing in cold parts of your house—such as garages, basements, and crawl spaces—to avoid frozen pipes (and to shorten the wait for hot water).
4. Never use an exposed pipe as a hanger rod for laundry. Doing so can loosen joints and fasteners.
5. Fix problems quickly. Even small leaks can make pipes corrode more quickly, and cause significant water damage or mold.
 

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Thank You for taking the time to check out our new website.  We hope it assisted you in making a great choice in deciding to work with Rick and his team of Experienced, Trained & Professional technicians.  We look forward to hearing from you and learning how we can help your family or business with all of your Plumbing, Heating & Drain Cleaning situations.  
 
 
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